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Planning Projects and Studies

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Transportation planning is the process of defining future policies, goals and infrastructure designs to prepare for future needs to move people and goods to destinations. Collier County plans for multi-modes of transportation facilities including local roads, highways, sidewalks, bike lanes, and transit. Transportation planning is about providing a safe, cost effective, and functional transportation system for all residents and visitors to Collier County by balancing access and mobility needs. Functions of Transportation Planning include:

  • Provide public information and assistance
  • Administration and implementation of the comprehensive plan
  • Responsible for special projects
  • Coordinate with the Florida Department of Transportation on transportation related decisions
  • Administration and implementation of transportation grants

In order to make informed decisions about transportation, Transportation Planners study many aspects of a facility before it is implemented.

Backhole removing concrete sidewalk       Sidewalk being repaired with a sidewalk close sign       Repairing sidewalk and surrounding sod area.

Current Planning Studies

 Current Planning Studies

  • Randall/Oil Well Road Corridor Study - the area includes the area between Oil Well Road and Randall Blvd. with 8th as the West boundary and Desoto Blvd. on an angle to Oil Well Road as the East Boundary. (More information of this study will be coming soon.)
  • Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study - The Scope of this study has not been finalized yet. This Study is anticipated to review the previous VBR Ext. Corridor Study from Collier Blvd. to 8th Street NE. (More information of this study will be coming soon and is expected in the Spring of 2017.)
  • CR951 Area Study - to help examine the feasibility and potential impacts of developing improvements to a corridor extending east of CR 951 to Benfield Road and from the Lord’s Way to City Gate Blvd. North and including the parcels of property already owned by Collier County. The Scope of this study has not been finalized yet.  Transportation Planning understands that a number of east-west and north-south corridors have already been considered by the Wilson Blvd. Ext./Benfield Rd. Corridor Study and this study would update the recommendations of that study to determine the need, feasibility and a preferred alignment for the identified corridor. (More information of this study expected in the Spring of 2017.)
Current - Randall Blvd./Oil Well Rd. Corridor Study

 

Randall Blvd and Oil Well Road Corridor Study logo 

 

Collier County completed a corridor study to evaluate potential roadway network improvements near Randall Boulevard and Oil Well Road in Collier County, Florida. The study evaluated several corridor alternatives to enhance traffic operations and safety conditions based on current and future travel demands.  On May 14, 2019, the Board of County Commissioners voted to approve the staff recommendation to expand Randall Blvd. (between 8th St. and Everglades Blvd.) to 6-lanes, Randall Blvd. (between Everglades Blvd. and Desoto. Blvd.) to for 4-lanes, and expand Everglades Blvd. (between Oil Well Rd. and Randall Blvd.) to 4-lanes.  This was referred to as Alternative 2 Plus (2+).

Approved Alternative (referred to as Alternative 2+)

Map of Alternative 2+ with lane calls and future network

The Study was initiated because of the current need for additional operational capacity in the study area not just the increased congestion and travel demand expected from the population and employment growth. The purpose of the Study was to develop an east-west corridor that would reduce congestion and improve traffic flow in the study area and accommodate future travel demand through 2045. Randall Boulevard is projected to have a deficient level of service by the year 2021.  The purpose and need for a project in the area are to reduce congestion, enhance regional mobility for people and goods, improve safety and improve emergency evacuation.

The study process involved the development of alternatives, a comparative evaluation of the social and environmental effects, the overall cost of each option, as well as public input.  A Project Kick-off Public Meeting was held on March 22, 2017.  The initial alternatives were presented at the Initial Alternatives Public Meeting on May 24, 2018 for public review and comment. The viable alternatives were further refined based on a more detailed analysis and were presented at the Viable Alternatives Public Meeting on April 11, 2019 for public review and comment. The No Build alternative was always considered an alternative throughout the study.  Below is the link to the presentation given to the Board of County Commissioners  (BCC)at the adoption meeting on May 14, 2019.  Also below are the initial alternatives and documents prepared for the Corridor Study for reference.

BCC Presentation on May 14, 2019.

 

 Project Location Map

Randall map of project location

 

For more information regarding  the Randall Blvd. and Oil Well Rd. Corridor Study Project Manager:

Lorraine Lantz, AICP

Collier County Transportation Planning

2685 S. Horseshoe Drive, Suite #103
Naples, FL 34104
Phone: (239) 252-5779
Lorraine.Lantz@CollierCountyFL.gov

 

PURPOSE AND NEED

The study involves the evaluation of several corridor alternatives that would:

People graphics button          Bike graphics button            Tree graphics button           Road graphics button

Reduce Congestion: Plan for future traffic needs due to population and employment growth

Enhance Mobility: Enhance regional mobility and access between I-75 and eastern Collier County, as well as improve freight (truck), transit, bicycle and pedestrian access

Improve Safety: Improve vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian safety by reducing conflicts

Enhance Emergency Evacuation: Improve evacuation routes and emergency response times

Minimize and/or Avoid Environmental Impacts: Identify the best alternative for the community and environment

 

STUDY ALTERNATIVES shown at the May 24, 2018 Initial Alternatives Public Meeting

 

Alternative 1 - New Alignment

Alternative 1 includes a new alignment roadway connecting Randall Blvd to Oil Well Road. Traffic would be able to bypass the existing north-south connections of Everglades Blvd and DeSoto Blvd, thus allowing potential roundabouts at those connections with Randall Blvd.

 Study Alternative 1 5-24-18

 

Alternative 2 - 6-lane Randall Blvd plus 4-lane Everglades Blvd

Since Oil Well Road is constrained to four lanes near Immokalee Road, traffic would have the option to use Randall Blvd and Everglades Rd as a bypass. This increase in traffic demand could be met with widening Randall Blvd to 6 lanes and Everglades Blvd to 4-lanes in the study area. Roundabouts are not likely to be included with a 6 lane Randall option.

 Study Alternative 2 5-24-18

 

Alternative 3 - 6-lane Randall Blvd plus 4-lane Everglades Blvd and 4-lane Desoto Blvd

Since Oil Well Road is constrained to 4 lanes near Immokalee Road, traffic would have the option to use Randall Blvd and Everglades Blvd and Desoto Blvd as a bypass. This increase in traffic demand could be met with widening Randall Blvd to 6 lanes, Everglades to 4-lanes, and Desoto to 4-lanes in the study area. Roundabouts are not likely to be included with a 6 lane Randall option.

Study Alternative 3 5-24-18

 

Alternative 4 - 6-lane Randall Blvd plus 6-lane Everglades Blvd

Since Oil Well Road is constrained to 4 lanes near Immokalee Road, traffic would have the option to use Randall Blvd and Everglades Rd as a bypass. This increase in traffic demand could be met with widening Randall Blvd to 6 lanes and Everglades to 6-lanes in the study area. Roundabouts are not likely to be included with a 6 lane Randall option.

 Study Alternative 4 5-24-18

 

 Check Back Soon as this section is currently under construction.

Notice of Public Information Meeting (Legal Ad)

Newsletters

Newsletter #1 (March 2017)
Newsletter #2 (May 2018) 

Newsletter #3 (March 2019)

Public Kickoff Meeting Materials (March 2017)

Study Schedule
Project Location Map
Aerial Corridor Map
Typical Sections Options

Initial Alternatives Public Information Meeting Materials (May 2018)

Title VI Board
Study Schedule
Project Location Map
Aerial Corridor Map
Improved/Unimproved Parcels
Typical Sections Options
Alternative 1 (without aerial)
Alternative 2 (without aerial)
Alternative 3 (without aerial)
Alternative 4 (without aerial)

Preliminary Conceptual Alternatives – Randall Blvd (aerial)

Preliminary Conceptual Alternatives – Everglades Blvd (aerial)

Preliminary Concept Alternatives - Desoto Blvd. (aerial)

Preliminary Conceptual Alternatives – New Alignment “S-Connector” (aerial)

Presentation at May 24, 2018 Public Meeting

Comment Forms

Project Documents
Check back soon!
Study documents will be published here for public review as they become available.

Project Links
Collier County Comprehensive Planning Section https://www.colliercountyfl.gov/your-government/divisions-a-e/comprehensive-planning

Current - Vanderbilt Beach Road

Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study

Corridor Approved by the Board of County Commissioners on April 17, 2006

The Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study was a planning effort to evaluate the extension of Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension as a through road east of Collier Boulevard (CR 951). The study attempted to identify and quantify the impacts of such an extension to Collier County’s transportation network, the Golden Gate Estates community, and the natural environment. Determining the fiscal cost of various Vanderbilt Beach Road extension alternatives was another key component of the study.

An extension of Vanderbilt Beach Road between Collier Boulevard and Wilson Boulevard is part of the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 2025 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). The 2025 LRTP was developed in 2000 and adopted in early 2001. The Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study evaluated the viability of extending the roadway farther to the east, to DeSoto Boulevard. This potential eastern extension to DeSoto Boulevard has been included in the Collier MPO 2030 LRTP, which was adopted on January 12, 2006. A Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension is projected to provide significant relief to traffic congestion on Golden Gate Boulevard and Immokalee Road and serve the rapid growth in the Golden Gate Estates area.

This planning corridor study began in early 2005 and concluded in April 2006. An extensive public involvement effort was pursued, consisting of numerous neighborhood and civic association meetings and two major public workshops.

Over 2,000 newsletters were mailed to area property owners in August, 2005 to announce the study’s first major public involvement activity, the Initial Alternatives Public Workshop. The workshop was held on September 14, 2005 and had more than 200 attendees, who viewed the numerous graphics on display and discussed the study with county staff and planning consultant staff members. Graphics on display included aerial photographs showing preliminary alignment concepts, traffic data and projections, and a proposed ranking and evaluation criteria for the study’s next phase. Attendees were also able to view a slide presentation providing an overview of the study effort. All of these graphics and the slide presentation are available below.

Following the September 2005 workshop, the study team performed a detailed analysis of each alignment alternative, including the severity of impacts and number of properties affected. These findings were the focus of the study’s second public workshop, which was held on Monday, January 30, 2006, and had close to 300 attendees. At this second workshop viable alternatives were presented and the study team recommended that 10 of the original alignment alternative segments be removed from further consideration. The remaining alignments continued to be refined and analyzed, and detailed cost estimates were developed. These findings were completed in early April, and the study's was determined. The preferred alternative consists of alignment segments A to BA to BC to C2A to D2 to E2 (see graphic below). This information was shared at smaller scale neighborhood meetings with the Citizens for Responsible Road Development group (April 6, 2006) and the Golden Gate Estates Area Civic Association (April 10, 2006).

The preferred alternative was determined using a ranking system similar to the criteria used in the Florida Department of Transportation’s (FDOT) Project, Development, and Environment (PD&E) study process. Keeping the public's most pressing issues in mind, highest weight was given to the number of existing homes impacted, with second highest weight given to project costs. The “viable alternatives” under final consideration were impacts on the number of existing homes ranging from 15 to 47, and estimated costs ranging from $167 million to $220 million. Graphics showing the weighting criteria and study results are available below. These graphics were on display at the community meetings on April 6, 2006 and 10, 2006, and minor modifications were made prior to the study’s completion.

The Collier County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) held a special meeting on Monday, April 17, 2006 at 5 p.m. in the Board of County Commissioners chambers. At this special meeting, pertaining to the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor, the Board of County Commissioners were presented with detailed information on the alternative routes for the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension, and received passionate input from county residents, particularly those in the Golden Gate Estates area. At the meeting’s conclusion, the BCC approved the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension and adopted study’s preferred alternative as its alignment.

The roadway design process for the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension began in spring 2007. Construction will be let to bid in two phases with the segment from Collier Blvd to Wilson Blvd. expected to be scheduled prior to the segment from Wilson Boulevard to DeSoto Boulevard. Collier County is committed to working closely with affected property owners during the right of way acquisition and roadway design phases of this project. If you have questions or comments regarding the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension, please contact Transportation Division staff via email or phone at (239) 252-8192.

Please click on the following links to see more information and detailed graphics: [Please note: Some aerials are large files and could take some time to download.]

Past Planning Studies

Past Planning Projects and Studies

Over the past ten to fifteen years, Transportation Planning has conducted many planning projects and corridor studies to provide technical assistance for Collier County. Many of these studies were based on needs in Collier MPO’s 2025, 2030 and 2035 Long Range Plans. These studies were done in cooperation with local jurisdictions, FDOT and extensive outreach with the private sector and the public. The following list of past projects is meant as a reference with historical information about the project/plan/report or study. In several instances, once the final project/plan/report or study has been presented to the Board of County Commissioners, no further action has been or is anticipated to be taken.

Past - Pine Ridge Rd. Corridor Congestion Study

The Collier County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) will consider several innovative intersection design concepts for the intersections along Pine Ridge Road from Livingston Road to Napa Boulevard.  The following is a map of the Pine Ridge Road Corridor Congestion Study Area.

The study results, findings, considerations and recommendations were presented to the BCC on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 during a regular Commission Meeting. After hearing public testimony, and considering the findings and recommendations, the Board of County Commissioners voted to:

1. Accept the Pine Ridge Road Corridor Congestion Study
2. Pursue a partial-Continuous Flow Intersection (CFI) at Pine Ridge Road and Livingston Road
3. Continue discussions with FDOT regarding innovative intersection improvements, e.g., the Restricted Crossing UTurn (RCUT) intersection of Pine Ridge Road and Whippoorwill Lane, and a Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) at the Pine Ridge Road/I-75 Interchange.

Below are links to the reports presented and approved by the BCC.  Some documents are large and may take a few minutes to download.

Executive Summary

Technical Report

Public Involvement Report

Appendix - Technical Report

 Study Area (2)

The 2016 Annual Update and Inventory Report (AUIR) indicated that the segment of Pine Ridge Road from Livingston Road to I-75 is deficient. The AUIR looks to see how much traffic a road facility can accommodate. The volume to capacity ratio of traffic on roads is calculated and evaluated and creates a Level of Service (LOS). The volume is the number of vehicles that use the road. The capacity is the maximum number of vehicles the road can accommodate. The Pine Ridge Road Corridor from Livingston Road to I-75 is currently operating at a LOS F; therefore, we have to start the process of designing improvements as soon as possible.

The project consultant modeled the corridor with conventional intersection improvements and even with those improvements, the corridor was predicted to fail again before 2040. The county wants to plan ahead instead of repeatedly reacting to anticipated operational issues. Generally, the costs associated with a conventional intersection are similar to the costs associated with the innovative intersections but the conventional treatments will fail in less than twenty years. The following is a diagram of the Conventional Improvements being considered.

 Conventional Intersections

The following video link shows a presentation of some of the potential concepts for the Pine Ridge Road corridor.  This video was shown at a public meeting on June 15, 2017. The video introduces the concepts by showing similar intersection improvements from other areas to help visualize these innovative concepts.

The descriptions below are intended to introduce the innovative intersections design concepts to the public.  Collier County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) will decide which type of intersection improvements should be designed and recommended to the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for further study.

During an extensive public comment period, the project team presented animations of the potential concepts to the public.  The animations use the future traffic volumes developed for the year 2040.  The forecast traffic estimation used the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization's travel demand model.  The animations are now available by using the links provided. 

Pine Ridge Road at Livingston

 Continuous Flow Intersection (CFI) also known as (aka) Partial Displaced Left-Turn (DLT) - CFI Link

• There will be no change to the traffic pattern on Pine Ridge Road.
• There is no left-turn arrow phase on Livingston Road in either direction.
• Traffic patterns for the left turn lanes to Pine Ridge Road from Livingston Road are relocated. Drivers turning left onto Pine Ridge Road from Livingston Road will no longer turn at the intersection; dedicated turn lanes will be accessed approximately 600 feet south of the existing intersection.
• There are two new signals located on Livingston to the north and south of Pine Ridge.
• Large overhead signs and/or pavement markings will be used to direct traffic.
• The CFI reconfigures the roadway by allowing vehicles to cross to the left side of the roadway before the intersection. This allows for additional concurrent traffic movements not possible at a conventional signalized intersection. These additional concurrent movements increase signal efficiency and provide the opportunity for longer green times for all movements.
• The concept was developed over 30 years ago. The CFIs are currently constructed and operational in many states including Colorado, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Texas and Utah. They are in design or construction in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia.

 CFI

Jug Handle   Jug Handle Link
• A jug handle is a type of ramp or slip road that changes the way traffic turns left at an at-grade intersection. Instead of a standard left turn being made from the left lane, left-turning traffic uses a ramp on the west side of the road south of the existing intersection.
• For the concept Collier County is proposing, there will only be a slight modification to the right turning traffic pattern on Pine Ridge Road to Livingston Road south. There is no change to traffic patterns on Pine Ridge Road continuing east or turning to Livingston Road north.
• Traffic patterns for all left turn movements from Livingston Road onto Pine Ridge Road will be relocated. Drivers turning left onto Pine Ridge Road (either EB or WB) from Livingston Road will no longer turn at the intersection; dedicated turn lanes will be accessed approximately 100 feet south of the existing intersection.
• There is one new signal located on Livingston to the south of Pine Ridge and one new signal located on Pine Ridge to the west of Livingston. All left turning movements from Livingston Road will use this new intersection and dedicated turn lanes.
• Large overhead signs and/or pavement markings will be used to direct traffic.
• The Jug handle reconfigures a portion of the roadway to allow movements like a “clover-leaf” ramp at an interchange. This reconfiguration removes the Livingston Road left turns from the main intersection. The concept is very common in New Jersey.

 Jug Handle

Single-Point Urban Interchange (SPUI) – Overpass / Underpass Link
• For discussion purposes there are two options:
      An Overpass where Livingston Road goes over (as a bridge) Pine Ridge Road (at-grade).
      An Underpass where Livingston Road goes under (a tunnel) Pine Ridge Road (at-grade).
• The concepts are for 4-Thru Lanes in the existing ROW, 6-Thru Lane option will require additional ROW.

 Overpass

Pine Ridge Road at Whippoorwill Lane


Restricted Crossing U-Turn (RCUT) (aka Superstreet) - RCUT Link

• There will be no change to the traffic pattern on Pine Ridge Road.
• Traffic patterns for straight and left turn lanes to Pine Ridge Road from Whippoorwill Lane are restricted. Drivers must turn right onto Pine Ridge Road from Whippoorwill Lane and proceed to new signalized intersections approximately 600 feet beyond the existing intersection to make a U-turn.
• Large overhead signs and/or pavement markings will be used to direct traffic.
• These additional concurrent movements increase signal efficiency and provide the opportunity for longer green times for all movements.
• The concept was developed almost 40 years ago. The RCUTs are currently constructed and operational in many states including Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

Super Street 

Pine Ridge Road at I-75 Interchange

Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) - DDI Link
• There will be no change to the traffic pattern on I-75.
• The two directions of traffic on Pine Ridge Road cross to the opposite sides of the road at a traffic signal as they pass under I-75. This configuration is unusual in that it requires traffic, while under I-75, to briefly drive on the opposite side of the road.
• Large overhead signs, barriers and/or pavement markings will be used to direct traffic.
• They began being constructed in the United States in 2009. As of January 2017, there are 86 DDI in operation in the United States. DDIs are fully operational in 21 states. They are in construction in 5 additional states. The only states that DDIs are not operational, in construction, design or being studies are: Connecticut, Hawaii, New Jersey, North Dakota and Vermont.
• FDOT is currently constructing a DDI at University Parkway and I-75 in Sarasota, and is designing a DDI for the Colonial Blvd interchange at I-75 in Fort Myers.

DDIPlease note - because the Whippoorwill Lane intersection is in close proximity, and partially included in the I-75 Limited Access Right-of-Way Limits, the study recommends the County pursue an Interchange Modification Report (IMR) with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for the RCUT and DDI portion of the corridor. 

The following Survey and Comment Form was available during the public meeting on June 15, 2017.  Comments will be accepted until July 17, 2017.  Forms may be e-mailed to ConnieDeane@colliergov.net, or mailed to the:

Growth Management Department
Attn: Connie Deane, Community Liaison
2885 Horseshoe Drive South
Naples, FL 34104

Below are some specific questions and answers related to the innovative concepts presented during the Pine Ridge Road Corridor Public Meeting.

1. What is being studied and why?

  • Pine Ridge Road (CR-896) between US 41 and Collier Boulevard (CR-951) serves as one of only four major east/west corridors within Collier County. Pine Ridge Road serves as a minor arterial corridor and provides a direct connection to one of four Interstate 75 interchanges within the urban area. Existing high peak period traffic volumes result in excessive delay along the entire length of the corridor from US 41 to I-75 currently and are predicted to increase significantly in coming years if solutions are not identified and constructed. In February 2016, Stantec, was contracted by the Board of County Commissioners to study the Pine Ridge Road corridor from (and including) Livingston Road to Napa Boulevard along with Livingston Road south of Pine Ridge Road to Marbella Lakes Drive.
  • It was determined that while conventional through-lane and intersection improvements might initially solve the problems, level of service failures would soon become a problem again, and a more long-lasting set of solutions is needed. The analysis of several innovative intersection designs proved to effectively manage the growing traffic throughout the corridor through 2040 and beyond.

2.  How does moving left hand turn lanes back from the intersection speed up thru-put when you still have to stop oncoming traffic for the left hand turning traffic at some time?

  • The “improvement” realized at the intersection comes from the removal of the dedicated NB/SB protected left-turn signal phase that no longer occurs at the main intersection since the left turns will move with and during NB/SB thru movement phase. By eliminating that phase, you remove the start-up and clearance lost time associated with it and the “green time” from that phase is distributed to the remaining phases, thereby improving the overall operation of the intersection. The “advanced” left turn signal is coordinated with the main signal at the intersection so that the NB/SB left turns can move at the same time as the E/W thru movements (when NB/SB thru traffic is obviously stopped), so there is no additional delay introduced by adding the new signals in advance of the intersection.

3. The Whippoorwill Lane intersection works fine now and the amount of traffic exiting Whippoorwill Road will not grow over time because that area is already fully developed. It also appears that you would be replacing one traffic signal with two traffic signals. How does that help speed up flow on Pine Ridge Road?

  • The need to improve the Whippoorwill Lane/Pine Ridge Road Intersection is due in large part to the projected increase in traffic on Pine Ridge Road that must pass through the intersection, 55,100 vehicles a day in 2016, projected to be 75,200 in 2040 (37% more traffic). Additionally, traffic volumes entering Whippoorwill will continue to grow in the future as there is still quite a few vacant tracts that will be developed on the north side and on the south side of Pine Ridge Road . Those tracts will only have access to Pine Ridge Road via the Whippoorwill Lane intersection.

  • The SuperStreet concept, like the other concepts, gets its value by reducing the number of phases at the main intersection by relocating them up/down stream from the main intersection. By eliminating the NB and SB left turns from Whippoorwill, you remove the start-up and clearance lost time associated with them and the “green time” from those phases can be given to the Pine Ridge Road thru movements. The new up/down stream U-turn signals are coordinated with the main signal so that all the left turns from Pine Ridge Road and the right turns from Whippoorwill lane, and the U-turns at the new signals, all happen in a coordinated fashion.

4. It appears the Divergent Diamond Interchange (DDI) concept may help people getting off I-75 but by complicating the traffic flow on Pine Ridge. I'm not sure it helps the flow on Pine Ridge. There are currently two traffic signals at I-75 which will be replaced by two or even four traffic signals on Pine Ridge road, so how does that speed up traffic?

  • The DDI concept is designed to eliminate left-turn movements and their associated traffic signal phases. Today motorists make left turns across the larger mainline flow of traffic, ultimately delaying the thru traffic movements in order to enter/exit I-75. The DDI concept shifts the EB and WB traffic to the other side of the median in advance of the interchange ramp terminals, thus allowing the entering and exiting ramp movements to be made without having to cross the opposing flow of traffic. This allows the signals to operate with only two phases which reduces start-up and clearance lost time and allows more green time to be given to both the I-75 ramps and mainline Pine Ridge Road. The result is a more efficient and coordinated signal system that reduces delay thru the interchange and improves the flow of traffic in a manner that is safer for the motoring public. The DDI reduces the number of crossing conflict points from four to two. The most severe conflict is one that is eliminated. Navigating thru the DDI is managed by proper signing and lane markings.

5. What about the potential interconnection of Whippoorwill Lane to Marbella Lakes Drive and a new traffic signal at Marbella Lakes Drive?

  • The interconnection between Whippoorwill Lane and Marbella Lakes Drive and new traffic signal are being considered with all innovative and conventional options. The interconnection is intended to facilitate more convenient travel options for area residents, and is not intended to facilitate “cut-through” traffic. Improving network connectivity will reduce travel time and congestion, and provide a secondary access to residents and first responders in the event of an emergency. A new traffic signal at Marbella Lakes Drive/Livingston Road would be constructed only if the interconnection is done.

Public Involvement Activities:

The Transportation Planning Staff and their consultant held a Public Information Meeting on June 15, 2017 at the Greater Naples YMCA on YMCA Road.  Residents, business representatives and visitors were welcome to stop by during the two-hour open house style meeting to review project information and displays as well as to talk one-on-one with county staff and the county’s design consultants. There was no formal presentation, but the video link above was shown on a loop during the entire meeting.

The Transportation Planning Staff and their consultant gave a PowerPoint Presentation to the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) on March 10, 2017.  That presentation was designed to introduce the innovative intersection design concepts to the elected officials and the public.  The PowerPoint is attached as a link to help understand the concepts for the Pine Ridge Road corridor.  Collier MPO Presentation March 10, 2017.  Similar presentation were also made to the MPO's committees during the month of February, 2017.

For more information regarding this study please contact: Principal Planner and Project Manager for this study Lorraine Lantz at 239-252-5779 or by e-mail at LorraineLantz@colliergov.net. News media inquiries may be directed to Community Liaison Connie Deane at 239-252-8365 or ConnieDeane@colliergov.net.

Past - CR 951 Extension PD & E Study

CR 951 Extension Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study

In September 2002, the Lee County Board of County Commissioners, in association with the Collier County Board of County Commissioners and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), initiated a Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study for the proposed northward extension of County Road 951 (CR951). Lee County DOT was the lead agency for the study, but staff from the Collier County Transportation Planning and FDOT were actively participating in its project management and administration.

The study area was east of Interstate 75, from Immokalee Road in Collier County to Alico Road in Lee County.  From early 2003 through 2005, numerous corridor alternatives were developed and thoroughly analyzed. In late 2005, a preferred alternative was selected and a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) completed. In 2010, the Lee County Board of Commissioners voted against moving forward with the extension of CR951 to the Lee County Line.  No further action has taken place on this project since that time.

In 2015 the Lee County MPO removed the extension of CR951 from their 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan.

If you have any questions, please contact Transportation Planning staff at (239) 252-8192 or by e-mail.

Updated: 11/18/2016

Past - East of CR 951 Bridge Study

EAST OF C.R. 951 BRIDGE STUDY - 2008

In 2008, a study was completed to determine locations where bridges may be built in Golden Gate Estates to connect roads that will improve traffic mobility, improve services, allow for faster response times for emergency services and improve evacuation routes. The study recommended several sites to the East of CR951. The MPO's 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) anticipates new bridges in Golden Gate Estates at 8th St., 16th St. and 47th Ave.  It also recommended the remaining bridges be identified as needs.  Below is a map from the MPO's 2040 LRTP which identified new bridge projects based on the East of CR951 Bridge Study recommendations. 

 bridges map (picture)

 

The East of CR951 Report was completed in August 2008.

View Map with proposed bridges (6MB PDF) 

        Final Report (6MB PDF)

        Report Appendices (18.2 MB PDF)

Updated 11/21/2016

Past - Green Blvd Extension

Green Boulevard Extension Corridor Study

The extension of Green Boulevard between Santa Barbara Boulevard and Livingston Road was part of the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 2025 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) and has been a part of the LRTP since 1996.  It was this placement on the LRTP Needs Plan which was the reason for the study.  The study began in the fall of 2004 and concluded in March 2006.

The 2040 LRTP was adopted by the Collier MPO in December 2015.  The Green Blvd. Extension remains an unfunded need.

The study concluded in 2006. The information provided below is for reference.

Please click on the following links to see more information and detailed graphics: [Please note: Some Aerials are large files and could take some time to download.]

Past - I-75/Everglades Blvd Interchange Justification Report

I-75/Everglades Boulevard Interchange Justification Report

A new interchange on I-75, in the vicinity of Everglades Blvd. remains on the 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) as a Need.  As of the December 2015 adoption of the 2040 LRTP, the project remains unfunded.

The following information is provided as a status.  The project remains unchanged since 2013.

The Draft Interchange Justification Report (IJR) was completed in the Spring of 2013. However, after submitting the Draft IJR to FDOT, a letter was sent from FDOT District One Secretary to the Growth Management Division Administrator stating that FDOT would not support the County’s request for a new interchange on I-75 at Everglades Boulevard at this time because the Draft IJR did not satisfactorily meet all eight of the FHWA’s policy points regarding new access to the interstate system. Although FDOT acknowledged the County’s position regarding the lack of adequate interstate access for a significant portion of the study area, they indicated that more convenient access is viewed as a supporting justification measure – not a primary reason for approving new interstate access. The primary stated reason for this denial was that in order to fully satisfy FHWA Policy, an IJR must show that the existing adjacent interchanges and interstate system cannot accommodate the projected future travel demand without major geometric improvements. FDOT’s current position is that there is adequate capacity at the existing adjacent interchanges to serve the travel demand through 2039 without a new interchange at Everglades boulevard. A new interchange was not recommended since the current cost feasible roadway network can satisfy the future travel demand.

Although FDOT did not support the new interchange request at this time, it did also state that “as land use and development patterns change and the existing interchanges cannot satisfy the need, a new interchange can be reevaluated in the future.” In the meantime, FDOT recommended that Collier county conduct further evaluations of off-system improvements and re-direct the new interchange funding to County bridge and roadway improvements projects within the Golden Gate estates area to reduce the travel times associated with accessing I-75.

In response to FDOT decision, the Collier MPO Board subsequently voted to move the I-75/Everglades Boulevard interchange into the 2021-2026 time frame of the updated 2035 Financially Feasible Long Range Transportation Plan.

Preliminary Draft - Interchange Justification Report (Revised March 2013)
I-75 and Everglades Boulevard 
Collier County, FL

Preliminary Draft - Interchange Justification Report
Appendices A through Q
I-75 and Everglades Boulevard

Appendix A 
Appendix B 
Appendix C_Part1 
Appendix C_Part2 
Appendix D 
Appendix E 
Appendix F 
Appendix G 
Appendix H_Part1 
Appendix H_Part2 
Appendix H_Part3 
Appendix H_Part4 
Appendix H_Part5 
Appendix I_Part1 
Appendix I_Part2 
Appendix I_Part3 
Appendix I_Part4 
Appendix I_Part5
Appendix I_Part6 
Appendix J_Part1 
Appendix J_Part2 
Appendix J_Part3 
Appendix K_Part1 
Appendix K_Part2 
Appendix K_Part3 
Appendix L_Part1 
Appendix L_Part2 
Appendix L_Part3 
Appendix M_Part1 
Appendix M_Part2 
Appendix N_Part1 
Appendix N_Part2 
Appendix N_Part3 
Appendix N_Part4 
Appendix N_Part5 
Appendix O_Part1 
Appendix O_Part2 
Appendix O_Part3 
Appendix O_Part4
Appendix P 
Appendix Q_Part1 
Appendix Q_Part2 
Appendix Q_Part3

Previous Status: (Updated March 2012)

  • IJR draft report to be delivered to County Staff in the spring of 2012
  • FDOT's CEE study is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2012
  • Both the IJR and the CEE must be approved before the project can move into the PD&E phase.

The Interchange Justification Report (IJR) is being developed to evaluate the need for a new interchange on I-75/Alligator Alley between Collier Boulevard (CR 951) and SR 29.  A new interchange along this 21-mile section of I-75 would improve mobility and interstate access for people living and working in eastern Collier County. Improved access to I-75 is especially critical during evacuation events such as hurricanes and brush fires. A new interchange in eastern Collier County would also help to alleviate some of the future traffic congestion projected to occur at the Collier Boulevard (CR 951), Golden Gate Parkway and Immokalee Road interchanges. The majority of the future growth that will occur in Collier County will be in the area bounded by Collier Boulevard, SR 29, I-75/Alligator Alley, and Immokalee Road. With more than half of the ultimate “build-out’ population of Collier County forecasted to live in Eastern Collier County, it is necessary to increase accessibility to I-75 for regional mobility as well as emergency evacuation needs. Population in Golden Gate Estates is currently estimated to be at approximately 37,000 in 2010 with build-out expected around 2080 with a population of approximately 79,000. An additional 260,000 people are projected to be living east of Golden Gate Estates in the next fifty years when factoring in the estimated population of Immokalee, Ave Maria, Big Cypress and future communities.

Due to the extremely limited nature of access in eastern Collier County, residents are forced to travel into the urban area to reach I-75 during emergency evacuation events. The majority of the traffic flow between the Golden Gate Estates area and I-75 takes place on Golden Gate Boulevard, Collier Boulevard, and Immokalee Road. To access I-75 this traffic must continue on Immokalee Road or Collier Boulevard, (or connect over to Pine Ridge Road or Golden Gate Parkway). Congestion at all four existing interchanges located in the urbanized portion of the county (i.e., Collier Boulevard, Golden Gate Parkway, Pine Ridge Road, and Immokalee Road) is expected to continue to increase in the future and all four of these interchanges are expected to exceed their capacities within the timeframe of the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization’s 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan. A new interchange between Collier Boulevard and SR 29 is anticipated to help alleviate some of the future traffic congestion projected to occur on the existing interstate and adjacent local roads.

An IJR is a first step in a rather long process in showing the need for an interchange. This formal proposal documents the need for and the operational impacts of a new interchange on a limited access facility, such as I-75. The IJR for this project will address the following:

  • The existing conditions of the study area roadway network (including current traffic operations);
  • Reasonable alternatives to a new interchange;
  • Future year traffic operations on I-75 (both with and without a new interchange);
  • Environmental fatal flaws;
  • Level of public support; and
  • Consistency with local, regional and state transportation plans.

Since I-75 is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the IJR must be submitted to FHWA for its review and approval. It is FHWA’s policy to maintain the safety and integrity of the Interstate Highway System to provide motorists with the highest level of service possible. Limiting access to only justified interchanges is critical to achieving this goal. For a new interchange to be approved by the FHWA, Collier County must demonstrate that the existing transportation network will not be able to accommodate the future year traffic demand, all reasonable alternatives to a new interchange have been considered and none of the other alternatives are able to satisfy the need for new access, and the location of the new interchange will not have any adverse impacts on I-75. The IJR for this project is being prepared in consultation with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District One.

Updated: 11/18/2016

 

Link to Communications & Customer Relations Archived Videos
http://www.colliergov.net/Index.aspx?page=2280

 

I-75/Everglades Blvd. Interchange Update Public Information Meeting on Nov. 4, 2010.  Scroll down to Nov.4, 2010 and select that option. 

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Printable Version of Handout
2010
2010

 

2010
2010

 

All comments and questions received through the public information process including comments from meetings, phone calls and inquiries through the Web site, are compiled and reviewed by the Project Manager.  For additional questions or a follow-up to a comment you have made, please contact Transportation Planning at 239-252-8192.

 

 

  

Click Here to Give Us Your Opinion! 

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Past - Master Mobility Plan (2011)

Collier County initiated the Master Mobility Plan (MMP) study to plan for the county’s mobility, land use, and infrastructure needs at population build-out to reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) while being sensitive to the environment. This project was made possible due to the receipt of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant provided by the United States Department of Energy; the grant was created as a result of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. 

In its entirety, the MMP consists of three phases:

  • Phase One: data review and collection (completed Summer 2010)
  • Phase Two: data analysis and MMP development (completed Winter 2011-2012)
  • Phase Three: recommendations for potential policy amendments (on hold)
Phase One of the MMP resulted in a data collection technical report and a data plans technical report. As part of Phase Two, a comprehensive public involvement process gathered input from stakeholders and the public that, along with the data and analysis, helped to guide and shape the development of the Master Mobility Plan Phase II Final Report. Phase Three is currently on hold. If conducted, it will develop language for potential policy amendments, vet that language to the public and then seek further direction from the Board of County Commissioners.

 

Updated 12/30/13

Past - Northeast Collier County Trail Feasibility Study

The Northeast Collier County Trail Feasibility Study concluded in the Fall of 2008.

The study reviewed the feasibility and determined a preferred corridor/alignment for a 12-foot multi-use pathway to be constructed within the proposed 51-mile Florida Power and Light (FPL) 230KV Transmission Line Corridor between its Orange Power Substation in Lee County and its Orange Tree Substation in Collier County.  The distance of the corridor in Collier County is approximately 20-25 miles.

The attachments provided below are for reference and informational purposes.

Proposed_FPL_Trail_ Corridor_Map.pdf

Collier Frequently Asked Questions 06-05-2008.pdf

FPL Survey 06-05-2008.pdf

Base Map Project Overview.pdf

Collier County walks the walk with trail plan

Greenway Trails Workshop draws small crowd

Public Meeting Summary 07-01-2008

Northeast Trail Study - Proposed Signage Appearance 1

Northeast Trail Study - Proposed Signage Appearance 2

Final Report Volume 1

Final Report Volume 2

F-1 Preferred and Final Alternative Alignment Overview

F-1 Revised 01-23-2009

 

Past - Vanderbilt Drive

Certain safety aspects of this study are being designed and constructed by the Collier County Transportation Engineering Department.  Please use the following link to see what projects have moved from the planning phase to the design and construction phase.

 Additional information is provided here for historical reference. 

Vanderbilt Drive Area Corridor Study

Vanderbilt MapThe Vanderbilt Drive Area Corridor Study began in late 2001. The purpose of this planning study was to evaluate the current and future transportation needs in the area south of Bonita Beach Road, north of 111th Avenue, and west of US 41.

The study's first public workshop was held on February 19, 2002 and was attended by 145 local residents. The most common concern voiced at the workshop was the need for bicycle and pedestrian facilities on two Vanderbilt Drive bridges just south of Wiggins Pass Road. Extensive public involvement was conducted as part of the study. 

An Existing Conditions Report was also completed for the study. This report documented the existing physical features in the area, such as traffic data, transportation infrastructure, transportation plans, land use plans, utilities, cultural features, natural features, and hazardous materials.

In 2004, the study's two highest-ranking/preferred alternatives were reviewed at the second public workshop:

  1. Widen Vanderbilt Drive to four lanes from Bonita Beach Road to Wiggins Pass Road, and widen Wiggins Pass Road to four lanes from Vanderbilt Drive to US 41

  2. Widen Vanderbilt Drive to four lanes from Bonita Beach Road to 111th Avenue North, widen 111th Avenue North to four lanes from Vanderbilt Drive to US 41, and widen Wiggins Pass Road to four lanes from Vanderbilt Drive to US 41

At that time, the need for widening the corridor was determined to be at least 10 years away.

The results of the study were that residents were strongly in favor of improving safety for bicyclists and pedestrians, particularly at the three bridges on Vanderbilt Drive south of Wiggins Pass. The following actions were the recommendations from the study:

  • Pursue Alternative A (widening of Vanderbilt Drive from Bonita Beach Road to Wiggins Pass Road, and Wiggins Pass Road from Vanderbilt Drive to US 41 ) as a long-range improvement.
  • Secure funding for new bicycle and pedestrian only bridges at the two southern locations on Vanderbilt Drive . Design. 
  • Work with the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to complete the replacement of the longest, northern bridge along Vanderbilt Drive.

Please click on the following links to see more information and detailed graphics: [Please note: Some Aerials are large files and could take some time to download.]

Past - Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension (2006)

Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study

Although the Board of County Commissioners adopted a Corridor for the Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension (VBR Ext.) in 2006, in 2008, the design of  VBR Ext. Corridor was terminated.

Transportation Planning is in the process of developing a scope to review, validate and update as necessary the prior work. The new project will study the VBR Ext. Corridor Study from Collier Blvd. to 8th Street NE. (More information of this study expected in the Spring of 2017.)

As a reference, the information regarding the prior study is below.

The VBR Ext. Corridor Study was a planning effort to evaluate the extension of Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension as a through road east of Collier Boulevard (CR 951). The study attempted to identify and quantify the impacts of such an extension to Collier County’s transportation network, the Golden Gate Estates community, and the natural environment. Determining the fiscal cost of various Vanderbilt Beach Road extension alternatives was another key component of the study.

An extension of Vanderbilt Beach Road (VBR) between Collier Boulevard and Wilson Boulevard was part of the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 2025 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). The 2025 LRTP was developed in 2000 and adopted in early 2001. The Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension Corridor Study evaluated the viability of extending the roadway farther to the east, to DeSoto Boulevard. This potential eastern extension to DeSoto Boulevard has been included in the Collier MPO 2030 LRTP, which was adopted on January 12, 2006. The MPO's 2040 LRTP (adopted in December, 2015) includes the extension of VBR from Collier Blvd. to 8th Street as a cost feasible project between Fiscal Years 2021-2025. 

Transportation Planning was involved in many aspects of corridor planning, alignment alternative considerations and public involvement for the VBR Ext. project. 

Please click on the following links to see more information and detailed graphics: [Please note: Some aerials are large files and could take some time to download.]

Past - Vanderbilt Drive Pathway (2006)
Certain safety aspects of this study are being designed and constructed by the Collier County Transportation Engineering Department. Please use the following link to see what projects have moved from the planning phase to the design and construction phase.

The Vanderbilt Drive Pathway Project requires extensive coordination with the Public Utilities Water Main Replacement Project and the Vanderbilt Beach Beautification MSTU’s Florida Power and Light Underground Power Conversion Project.


Vanderbilt Drive Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Study

Additional information is provided below for reference. 


Vanderbilt Drive April 2013 Meeting Exhibits:


NorthCorridor 3 Crosswalks

NorthCorridor 4 Crosswalks

Roundabout Images

Sign Images 

SouthCorridor-Dunes

SouthCorridor-Widening

Vand-Overall


Vanderbilt Drive 2012:

Vanderbilt Drive Meeting GIS Exhibit

Pathway Plans (PDF)

January 2012 Public Meeting Handout

Comments from the Vanderbilt Drive Corridor Improvements Public Information Meeting on 01-26-12

Past - Wilson Blvd Extension (North Belle Meade Area)

Over the past ten to fifteen years, Transportation Planning has conducted many planning projects and corridor studies to provide technical assistance for Collier County. Many of these studies were based on needs in Collier MPO’s 2025, 2030 and 2035 Long Range Plans. These studies were done in cooperation with local jurisdictions, FDOT and extensive outreach with the private sector and the public. The following list of past projects is meant as a reference with historical information about the project/plan/report or study. In several instances, once the final project/plan/report or study has been presented to the Board of County Commissioners, no further action has been or is anticipated to be taken.

The Collier MPO is in a unique position to create a vision for all of Collier County (including the Cities of Everglades City, Marco Island, Naples and unincorporated Collier County). The MPO’s planning across the jurisdictions helps set the plan for Collier County Transportation Planning. The current studies that Collier County Transportation Planning is starting to embark on were derived from the Collier MPO’s 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan.

Future planning studies identified in the MPO's 2040 LRTP Needs Plan:
1. Randall Blvd./Oil Well Road Study Area
2. Green Blvd. Ext./North Belle Meade Study Area
3. CR951 Congestion Relief Study

 study areas picture

The Wilson Boulevard Extension (North Belle Meade Area) Corridor Study is not currently being re-studied or updated.  The information below is for reference only.

At its regularly scheduled June 28, 2005 meeting, the Board of County Commissioners (BCC) conducted a public hearing regarding short and long term transportation needs in the North Belle Meade Area. At the hearing's conclusion, the BCC adopted the following recommendations:

  1. Instruct staff to incorporate the study presented today into its current update of the Collier Long-Range Transportation Plan and the East of CR 951 Study.

  2. Instruct staff to continue an open dialogue with the community and the environmental interests to bring a recommended roadway network for the North Belle Meade area to the BCC for approval by April 2006.

  3. Require Florida Rock Industries to provide for any needed mitigation required to accommodate their connection to CR 951 in the vicinity of Landfill Road.

  4. Require Florida Rock Industries to also develop a haul route connection to I-75 based on an extension of Wilson Boulevard, or secondarily, to Everglades Boulevard south of Frangipani, with possible temporary connection to I-75, if allowed.

These recommendations concluded a process that had been ongoing since the North Belle Meade Overlay was adopted by the County Commission on June 19, 2002, as part of the Rural Fringe Plan Amendments of the Collier County Growth Management Plan. The Wilson Boulevard Extension Corridor Study was required and guided by the Rural Fringe Amendments. In order to be consistent with these requirements, the corridor study has evaluated both east-west and north-south transportation alternatives in the North Belle Meade area. East-west alignments evaluated included the extensions of Landfill Road, Keane Avenue/Brantley Boulevard, and Green Boulevard, while the north-south alignments evaluated included a connection to Interstate 75 or other service road (such as an extension of Landfill Road).

The Wilson Boulevard Extension Corridor Study was conducted by consulting firms Hole Montes and Wilson Miller under the guidance and oversight of the Collier County Transportation Planning Department. During an early stage of the study, this public/private initiative lead to the development of nine alternatives (including a no-build alternative). These alternatives were presented to the public in a workshop on September 29, 2004.

Those attending the first workshop were asked to express their preference(s) as to the different alternatives proposed. The summary of the results of that input reveals that there was no clear support for any single alternatives and in fact, support was spread out over a number of “favorites”, including “all” or “none” of the alternatives. Additionally, 17 percent of the respondents suggested variations in the nine alternatives presented.

After consideration of the alternatives analyses and public input, the Collier County Transportation Division and the consultants developed a preferred alternative. These proposed corridor improvements were defined in two implementation time frames, 2005-2015 and Beyond 2015 in order to distinguish the suggested timing of specific plan components. It is important to understand that all of the alignments depicted are conceptual and that the final location of future right-of-ways would be determined during a future design phase for a specific improvement project. Also, County Transportation staff later determined that a lack of adequate funding would likely require that all major improvements take place in the "Beyond 2015" timeframe.

These Preferred Alternative Corridor Improvements were presented at the study’s second public workshop, held on April 13, 2005. 132 persons attended the workshop and numerous others submitted comments in the following weeks. The workshop and comment forms resulted in substantial feedback, and prompted some revisions to the alternatives before being included in the study’s final report and presented to the BCC on June 28, 2005

The study’s final report, all comments from the two public workshops, and numerous other maps and graphics are available in the links below (in pdf format). If you have any questions or seek further information regarding the Wilson Boulevard Extension Corridor Study, please contact Transportation Planning staff at (239) 252-8192.  To learn more about the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Long Range Transportation Plan at their website.

Please click on the following links to see more information and detailed graphics: [Please note: Some Aerials are large files and could take some time to download.]


Growth Management Department logo

Capital Project Planning, Impact Fees, and Project Management

Capital Project Planning Building
2685 Horseshoe Drive S, Suite 103
Naples, FL 34104
Phone: (239) 252-8192

Updated 06/24/2019